Global Read Aloud

Okay so I have used Twitter a lot for professional connection and learning for the past few years. And I know its power. But I’ve never really witnessed firsthand how powerful it can be! I’ve tweeted out a question and gotten a few responses. I’ve never really had an overwhelming amount of responses to something – until yesterday.

I created a Padlet (basically an interactive corkboard) about the first 5 chapters of a book called Pax. Pax is one of the books chosen for this year’s Global Read Aloud, a collaborative project designed to engage students with reading. I tweeted out the link to the Padlet, inviting people to collaborate on it. In less than 24 hours, I’ve had more than 63 students view and add to my Padlet from all over the WORLD! That’s amazing! Not to mention that it’s incredibly fun (for lack of a better term) to have people comment on your stuff. I get so excited when I have a comment on my blog to moderate; it validates me so much more than just writing for myself. While I get pleasure in sharing my words just to share and get my thoughts out, I’m much more nuanced and thoughtful when writing a blog because of the potential for other people to read it.

This is my second year participating in the Global Read Aloud, and it is such an amazing and inspiring project. I don’t know how Pernille Ripp does it, but she chooses books that are beautiful, engaging, and resonates so much with a variety of students. Last year, we read Fish in a Tree to our 4-6 Reading Class. This is a group of students who are used to feeling the like the “dumb” kids because they struggle with reading. It was such a powerful experience to see them EXCITED about reading and giving them a voice to share how they were connecting with the book.

This year, Pax is also really impacting our students. Working in an urban district, students come to us with a lot of deficits, many with unstable home lives. Peter (one of the main characters) is relatable to them in a lot of ways because he too struggles with belonging, betrayal, and all the challenges of growing up. Pax is also relatable, even though he’s a fox, because he struggles with finding his way and who he is. I cannot wait to get deeper into this book with my students.

Are you participating in the GRA? We’d love to connect with you via Skype or Google Hangout! 

 

What If…?

Listening to Kaleb Rashad as part of Week 3 IMMOOC I was so inspired and energized. I wish ALL administrators had his passion and energy. His message about relationships and equity really resonated with me. Early on, I recognized the importance of building relationships with my students and making connections to their worlds. As I have moved to various educational settings, this is still true, and perhaps even more so when working with adults. Some students will follow the rules and be compliant; they have learned how to play the game of school. Teachers are incredibly busy people and their time spent in professional development needs to be meaningful, targeted and full of impact.

Designing professional learning opportunities that resonate with teachers can be really hard when you’re in a system that is stuck in traditional ways of doing things. My district currently has a once a week “late start” Wednesday. Each Wednesday across the district, teachers spend 2 hours with their colleagues immersed in professional learning. While it sounds good in theory in that we aren’t asking teachers to stay after school, all teachers are present, it’s a consistent schedule, etc., in practice it is somewhat different. For starters, many of the weeks are pre-set by the district. That means that building principals – who know their staff better than anyone – don’t have as much autonomy to decide what is on the agenda. Additionally, two hours isn’t always enough time when there are myriad items on the agenda. Being the only technology integrationist in the district, it is impossible for me to be in 25 buildings at the same time. It makes it pretty difficult to provide support to more than one building a week. Of course we end up with a situation where it’s a “one-size fits all” PD instead of tailored to what teachers want, need, or are interested in.

Here are my ideas on what innovative professional learning looks like:

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School Year Goals

One of the best parts of working in the education field is the opportunity to start fresh each school year. Similar to how lots of people set New Year’s Resolutions on January 1st, I have been spending a lot of time thinking about what my goals for this school year are.

Rather than come up with a list of three or four “things” I want to implement in schools or projects to complete, I have decided to focus instead on something that is both small and large. Last year, I heard George Couros speak at ISTE, and one of things he said really stuck out to me: “What if every teacher tweeted one thing a day they did in their classroom […] and took five minutes a day to read each other’s tweets? What impact would that have on school culture?” You can read more about Building Culture from George here. 

Today’s educational environment – in Michigan especially – is challenging and demoralizing. Threatened with closure, almost 100 schools throughout the state are waiting to learn their fate. The state’s largest public school district (Detroit Public Schools) have students and teachers in buildings with mold growing on the walls, floors, and ceilings. It’s a mess, and it can be really hard to stay positive and work throughout the school year to continually try to innovate and come up with ways to engage students. It is challenging when you’re in the thick of it, to remember all those little moments that get buried in the daily minutiae of teaching.

So, this year, my goal is to tweet out one thing each day that I did or saw in my classroom observation. As the Technology Integrationist for the entire district – all 25 schools – I am sure I will have a lot of things to share! I’m going to share to the hashtag #LansingComeUp. As part of the mission to bring positivity and hope to this area, students brainstormed this hashtag as a way to show people that great things are happening in our schools and we are coming up. I invite you to join me; let’s make this year the best one yet!

Using KidBlog

Last week I wrote about the introduction of blogging with students using paper and pencil. It was a really powerful lesson that helped students to think about the realities of writing online and that there are real people behind the posts. It also was really engaging for them to see others comment on their posts.

Now, we are moving students into the digital realm and having them blog online using KidBlog. We chose this platform because our students don’t have email addresses or GAFE accounts, so Blogger was out. I have used KidBlog in the past and had a fair amount of success with it. We also liked that the educator version was reasonably priced – $35 for a calendar year – and it came with lesson plans, support, and ideas.

Students have the ability to personalize their blog posts through different backgrounds, images, media, text, and font colors. They also can personalize their blog avatar. These things go a long way in giving students ownership over their learning.

Since we started pretty late in the year, students have not used KidBlog as much as we would like, but they are LOVING it! Ms. Rubio wrote a blog post about why she was out sick from work and gave students an assignment to complete online. She can then interact with the students even while she is out of the classroom. It also helps students to develop empathy and realize that their teacher is a person with challenges and issues outside of the classroom. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that!

Earlier this week, I logged in to KidBlog and commented on several students’ posts. They were so excited to have their posts read and to continue the conversation. Ms. Rubio has already said she wants to start off the school year with her students on KidBlog. It’s such a great way for them to document their learning and growth throughout the year. It also provides a great way for kids to get to know more about their classmates. Students who tend to be shy about speaking up or don’t always have a chance to share in class can now comment and post about their learning and their opinions. IMG_5269 (1)IMG_5270 (1)

Blogging With Students

It can be really hard to get students to write – right? So often students do not resonate with the topic we’re asking them to elaborate on, or there are barriers and challenges that make writing at length difficult for them. One of the schools that I work with has a very large ELL population, and it can be challenging for them to write – they don’t know the English words or they don’t know how to spell them. Writing for a teacher, turning it in, waiting for feedback, then shoving the paper in a folder isn’t always the most meaningful way for students to grow in their writing. Too often the feedback comes at the end – and it only comes from one person.

One of the teachers I work with really understands this struggle and has been working to make writing curriculum more engaging for her kids. We worked through a couple of different platforms and decided on KidBlog. We liked the built in safety features and – because our students don’t have email addresses – it was an easy way to get student accounts without collecting personal information.

Blogging opens up the opportunity for students to share and engage with many other people – whether it’s the other students in the classroom, their friends at another school, or globally. When students know that others are reading their work, they have a higher level of ownership over it. Aside from that, the conversations often continue as others comment and ask questions and the author engages in a dialogue. Students, then, are naturally reading and writing more as they respond to comments and questions on their own blogs as well as interacting with others’ blogs as well.

To get kids excited about blogging, we knew we had to go beyond just “Tell me about your goals” or something similar that kids have been asked to think about many times before. Having attended a session at a conference last summer on introducing blogging to students, I knew one of the best ways to get kids excited about writing was to let them write about anything they wanted – their passion. I wrote a short “post” (on paper) about one of my passions – running. I decorated the paper similar to how you would decorate a blog page, and then read the blog to students.

Students were then given 10 minutes to write about anything they wanted. The only rule was they couldn’t stop writing for the entire 10 minutes. At first they were reluctant and hesitant; many of them didn’t think they could write for 10 minutes about anything. We continued to encourage them to write and write without talking. After a bit, students did settle in and the quiet was really neat – just hearing the sound of pencils on paper. Once students had time to write their post, we discussed commenting. I shared with students how one of the ways blogging is different than just writing something and turning it in, is the opportunity to have communication with others who are reading your blog. We talked about some of the things students might have commented after reading my blog post about running.

A little mini lesson was really all we needed to remind students about writing in complete sentences, using proper grammar and spelling, and writing comments that added to the conversation. We kept comparing it to what you would say if someone told you the story face to face. Most students understood that it would be rude to just say “Cool” to someone’s story. After that, we gave each student 3 sticky notes and had them write their names on each note. Then, students got up and walked around the room, reading other blog posts, writing comments on the sticky notes, and posting them around the edges of the blog. IMG_5254

It was really neat to see kids reading and quiet. Students were on task and engaged. At the end of the commenting period, we asked students to share what they learned, how the comments made them feel, etc. Then, the one student who had been the most reluctant to engage in the lesson at the beginning asked if they could do it again, reading others’ posts. We ended up doing it two more times. One student wanted to read everyone’s post and comment on everyone’s blog. It was awesome!

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